Irish or Gaelic

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jess
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Beitragvon jess » 06.02.2005, 15:47

i just know "kiss my ass". unfortunatly i dont know how 2 spell it...

i did work experience in a primary school and they were talking lots of irish. ie when they wanted to go to the bathroom, they said it in irish and i didnt have a clue what they said...

slàn, jess

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Beitragvon Linchen » 07.02.2005, 15:37

"Póg mo thóin". means kiss my ass, you probably know how to pronounce it..... =)
"Án bhfuil cead agam dul amach más é do thoil é?" means can i got to the bathroom please? and literally it says "di i have permission to go to the bathroom?", really funny when i heard that long sentence for just a short english phrase for the first time.....
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jess
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Beitragvon jess » 07.02.2005, 16:31

i know glasri (gemüse), Tá ocras andauin orm which means " i have the hunger of the world in my tommy"

slán, julia

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Beitragvon Linchen » 19.02.2005, 13:51

i noticed only noe that the title is wrong! Gaelic is the language spoken in Scotland, slightlt different from Gaelige, which is spoken here.....

i saw "million dollar baby" last week and the whole audience started laughing when frankie started learning Gaelige......
and i learned a new word " mo cuiséal" my darling =)
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Beitragvon jules » 19.02.2005, 16:00

hey leute..
will mich hier jetz nich in die irland-clique einmischen, aber da ich ja hoffentlich nach schottland komm, sind wir ja sozusagen nachbarn, da die schotten und iren sich ja bekanntlich sehr gut verstehn..*g*
ich würd während meines ATJ auch total gern gälisch lernen, klingt total schön, find ich..irisch hab ich leider noch nie gehört, klingt bestimmt genauso schön..hach, ich freu mich schon so..!!! :mrgreen:
jetz sind wa also wieder da...

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Hi no Tori
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Beitragvon Hi no Tori » 19.02.2005, 19:48

Linchen hat geschrieben:i noticed only now that the title is wrong! Gaelic is the language spoken in Scotland, slightlt different from Gaelige, which is spoken here...
Sorry, but: Not quite. Gaelic is the general term for the family of Gaelic languages, including Scottish Gaelic, Irish Gaelige, Welsh Manx and some more... So it's not exactly wrong. ;)

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Beitragvon Linchen » 02.03.2005, 16:39

all right, i wasn't that familiar with the whole thing.....
but i just take it, that if you say "irish or Gaelic" in the title, that you would actually mean, irish gaelige ...... anyway doesn't really matter!

yesterday our neighbour's kids taught me a bit of irish, they were so proud of me after i could say "conas atá tu?" ...... =)
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Beitragvon de_juuudith » 17.05.2005, 21:33

Ok I was just wondering, if there is any way I can learn the Scottish or Irish Gaelic from home, without going there???

I would be happy if somebody could help me on that.
Thanx!!!!
See ya and Howdy from Wyoming,
Judith

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Beitragvon Naddel » 31.05.2005, 15:51

Do the people in Ireland speak English or Irish Gaelic at school ?
I´ve never heard someone talking Irish but it looks great ;-) .

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Beitragvon kaktusfeigenbaum » 02.06.2005, 10:36

Do the people in Ireland speak English or Irish Gaelic at school ?
I´ve never heard someone talking Irish but it looks great .

*~NaDdEl~*


Of course they speak English at school in normal lessons like maths, science and so on. But they have to learn Irish at school, too. Otherwise they cannot become their Leaving Certificat. But exchange students can do homework in that lessons or at some schools go to another course.
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Gast

Beitragvon Gast » 02.06.2005, 16:06

Of course they speak English at school in normal lessons like maths, science and so on. But they have to learn Irish at school, too. Otherwise they cannot become their Leaving Certificat. But exchange students can do homework in that lessons or at some schools go to another course.


Thanks :wink: :mrgreen:

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Beitragvon Higanbana » 03.06.2005, 06:37

Hi no Tori hat geschrieben:
Linchen hat geschrieben:i noticed only now that the title is wrong! Gaelic is the language spoken in Scotland, slightlt different from Gaelige, which is spoken here...
Sorry, but: Not quite. Gaelic is the general term for the family of Gaelic languages, including Scottish Gaelic, Irish Gaelige, Welsh Manx and some more... So it's not exactly wrong. ;)Ja ne!


Hej Tori-chan,

well, to be frank, Welsh is not a Gaelic language, it's just a Celtic one. Gaelic itself comes from the celtic word for Irish or Scottish, and the Welsh refer to themselves as CYMRAEG.

@ Gast

I don't know about Ireland, but there are quite a few schools in Wales that offer both classes instructed in English or Welsh. A friend of mine used to go to a school in the countryside, and she told me who fed up she was that the students of the Welsh spoken classes were treated better than pure Englisch speakers as she was since former ones were considered to be willing to preserve the Welsh heritage or stuff like it.

The primary schools in Newtown / Powys offered beginners' lesson for the English speaking students, my friend's daughter loved them but I do doubt whether they ever reached a level to speak it just for fun. But if one wants to become a public worker in Wales, he or she is obliged to speak Welsh fluently as well.

Take care

Higanbana

PS: One of my colleagues used to be a Welsh Welsh, i.e. he spoke Welsh as a first language and English as a second. (There are quite a few English Welsh, especially where I used to live. :cry: ) And I just loved his accent, it was so quite.

http://www.siliconglen.com/celtfaq/1_3.html

The Celtic languages are divided into two classes: Insular and Continental

Continental Celtic languages are no longer spoken, but consisted of: Celtiberian (Spain), Gaulish (Swiss/Northern Italian variant known
as Lepontic) and Galatian in Turkey(!).
Galatian was spoken until about the 5th century.
Lepontic turns out to be P-Celtic. Celtiberian turns out to be Q-Celtic, the split occuring prior to the 7th Century BC.

Insular Celtic is divided into:
P-Celtic, also called Brythonic or British
Q-Celtic, also called Goidelic or Gaelic

P-Celtic consists of:
Cumbric (extinct), Welsh, Cornish, Breton
Breton and Cornish were apparantly mutually intelligible until
the 15th century

Q-Celtic consists of:
Irish, Scots Gaelic, Manx
These languages are almost mutually intelligible today.
i.e. Donegal Irish and Islay Scots Gaelic are quite close.

Pronounciation note:
The word Gaelic is pronounced "Gaylik" when talking about Irish Gaelic or Manx Gaelic; the modern preference is to pronounce it "Gallic" when talking about Scots Gaelic (this being much closer to the pronunciation of "Gaidhlig" which is what this language calls itself).

Historically in Scotland in both English and Scots the word was pronounced the same as for the other two languages. Indeed some Scots Acts spell the word "Gaylick". Therefore for an non-Gaelic speaker to use this pronunciation is not "wrong", just not as currently preferred in Scotland.

History
The most ancient remnants of a celtic dialect in written form have been found in northern Italy (Sesto Calende, ~600 b.C., Castelletto Ticino, ~575-550 b.C.). It is a relatively recent acquisition that these (Lepontic) inscription are actually written in a celtic dialect (Lejeune, "Lepontica", 1971).

British Isles
There were two waves of invasions to the British Isles which gave rise to the P/Q variaties we have today. The first invasion was to Ireland in the 4th century BC, probably from Western France. This variant became Gaelic and spread from Ireland to the Isle of Man and Scotland. The second invasion (P-Celtic) was to southern England and Wales and from there (in 5th century AD) to Brittany. Celtic languages have also spread from Britain. 150 Welsh speakers started a Welsh colony in Patagonia in 1865, and there is also a Scots Gaelic community in Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. (about 1,000 speakers today). Breton is not classified as continental Celtic because it came to Brittany from Britain. There was a Gaelic speaking community in the Carolinas but this died out in the early 20th century.

The p-q-phenomenon is found in Italic (compare the Latin quattor, 'four', with the Oscan petora), and certain linguists claim that there was an Italo-Celtic people by the end of the 21st century BC. However, the similarities are merely coincidental, e.g. the future tense in Irish (root + b + ending) and Latin (root + f + ending), or that passive verbs end with -r (previously believed to be a characteristic of Italic and Celtic, but later found in Hittite and Tocharian (both extinct).

Pictish: The Picts were Celts but spoke a mixture of languages. They spoke a pre-Celtic language for ritualistic purposes (source: Prof Derek Thompson - "Why Gaelic matters"), and Pictish at other times. Pictish is mentioned The Cambridge Encyclopedia of language as possibly being Celtic or possibly being a non-Indo-European isolate like Basque. Thompson says "It is clear from the evidence of place names that there was much common ground between [Brythonic] and the Celtic constituent of Pictish". There is some debate as to whether Pictish was non IE or not, as there is so little information available on it.

Many of the Scottish Island names including Arran, Skye, Lewis and Jura are Pictish. For more information on placenames: (W.F.H. Nicolaisen "Scottish Place Names", Batsford, London 1976).


If anybody wants to listen to several Celtic languages, go http://www.celticobsessions.com/Celtic%20Languages.htm

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Beitragvon BloodyMarvellous » 04.06.2005, 20:26

I think I'll just join in at this point :wink: I find Celtic languages quite fascinating and I've been teaching myself a bit of Scots Gaelic. So I can say things like:

Dè an t-ainm a th'oirbh? - What's your name? (polite form)
pronounced something like (Dschey an tenem a heröf?). Looks ridiculous :lol:

or:

Ciamar a tha thu? - How are you? ("normal" form)
pronounced like (Kiamar a ha u).

The difference between "sibh" and "thu" is more or less the same as the difference between "Sie" and "du".

I think the link Higanbana posted is really good. Particularly then first link on that page, as that's where I got my information from :wink:
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The answer is 42. ;)

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Beitragvon Shishi no Hiraga » 09.06.2005, 17:39

I only know some Irish words and pronunciations because of my Irish CD-Collection of some Scottish and Irish traditionel music! It seems to be a pretty interesting language, maybe some day in the future, when I'm bored of all the other languages... :wink:
But now, it's only "Go n-éirí an bóthair libh!", to find some comparison to this thread! :mrgreen:
But it's very fascinating to read your dialogs, well, I can't undersand anything but... in a way that's funny too! :mrgreen:

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Beitragvon Ballycumber » 12.09.2005, 17:24

Does anyone know where to get cds and cassetes to learn Irish??? Thx!
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